Discrimination Attorneys

Under both federal and state law, in order to ensure that every member of society is provided an equal opportunity to enter and be productive within the workforce, it is illegal to discriminate against an employee because of race, nationality, language, age, disability, religion, pregnancy, and a myriad of other protected traits. In order to properly prove a claim for discrimination, 3 elements must be shown: 1) You suffered discrimination in relation to your employment; 2) You suffered a significant adverse employment action; and 3) There is connection between the discrimination and the adverse employment action. Examples of significant adverse employment actions are failing to hire, failing to promote, demotion, and termination of employment. If you feel that your employer has, or continues to discriminate against you, you should contact an employment attorney as soon as possible. You have one year from the date of the adverse employment action to file a claim with the Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH). Once a claim has been filed, and a right to sue letter has been issued, you have one year to file a claim in superior court. It is important to understand that unless the discrimination has been continuous, the deadline to file with DFEH is calculated by the last instance of discrimination. The statute of limitations (the time limit you have to bring a claim in court) is often unclear, which is why it is imperative to consult with an attorney as soon as possible to preserve your claims.Discrimination

Discrimination Attorneys